Sustainable Fish

It all started with a pack of wild Alaskan salmon I bought at my local Waitrose grocery store. My first reaction was shock at seeing sockeye from the U.S. west coast way over here in London. My second reaction was surprise at how cheap the price was – a bargain at 6.99GBP for two portions. In the U.S. I would pay $20/lb and up. There were a lot of unanswered questions in my mind about how the fish got here and whether it was a better choice than farmed salmon, which is omnipresent throughout the UK.

This lead me to a class on sustainable seafood at the Billingsgate Seafood School in Canary Wharf. It started at an eye watering 6 a.m. and was headed up by the bubbly C.J. Jackson, Chief Executive of the school. We started off with a tour of the market, which was bustling at that time in the morning.

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C.J. gave us the lowdown on sustainability and origin of product at every stop. Asian distributors are bringing in more exotic varieties, like these parrot fish.

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Lots of native species were front and center, such as these pretty lobsters.

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A dresser full of live eels gave me the quivers!

Seaweed harvested around the U.K. is becoming more and more popular.

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Gorgeous farmed oysters from the island of Jersey.

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After the tour we reconvened above the market. There are conference rooms, a comfortable dining room and a full-on professional kitchen. Kippers, buttered toast and coffee were served. For those new to kippers, the cook said, “They taste just like bacon” , which they did, if a tad bonier!

Presenters from some of the biggest wholesalers were up next. Direct Seafood, New England Seafood and the head of the Norwegian Seafood Council all gave background and updates on sustainability in the marketplace.

There are several certification organizations and watch dog groups that share information on wild fish as well as oversee farmed seafood. The most noteworthy for the consumer are the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) and the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). MSC certifies through a third party rating system what wild seafood is sustainable; in 2017 just 12 % of wild caught seafood was certified. Therefore farmed fish and shellfish is important to the future supply of protein to feed the world. The ASC oversees the operation of seafood farms verifying they are environmentally and sustainably managed. The MCS produces “The Good Fish Guide“, a valuable tool that consumers can use to determine which fish are the most sustainable, both farmed and wild caught.

It is ultimately up to the consumer, however, to make sure they are getting a fully sustainable product. If the packaging is labelled with an MSC or ASC sticker then you can be assured you are getting the most sustainable seafood on the market. If there is no label then you need to ask questions. For wild fish, find out where the fish comes from and how it was caught. For farmed seafood, ask where the farm is, what type of food the fish is fed and if any antibiotics are part of the diet. Download the Good Fish Guide app to your phone so you can refer to it.

The listings for what is sustainable are shifting constantly so it’s more imperative than ever to be informed. By voting with your pocketbook you can reduce the negative impact on the environment and contribute to healthy oceans while enjoying wonderful fish and shellfish.

By the way, that wild Alaskan salmon I get from Waitrose, is labelled with the MSC label. The carbon footprint is high for getting it to London from Alaska but it may just be more sustainable than farmed salmon and to my palate, it tastes better.

 

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Garlic and Herb Butter Oysters

1 dozen ASC certified oysters

75 grams salted butter, room temperature

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

2 garlic cloves, minced

Preheat oven to 200C. Shuck the oysters and sit each one in the cup of a muffin tin to keep the liquor in tact. Mash the butter with the garlic and parsley and divide the mixture between the oysters. Roast in the oven until the butter melts and the oysters are just cooked through, about 5 minutes. Serve with fresh lemon for squeezing.

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Cheese for Dinner

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It’s the season for Vacherin du Haut-Doubs, a gooey, buttery round of cheese from the Jura region of France. It’s made in the winter months when the cows come down from the high mountain pastures and don’t produce as much milk. During the spring and summer the milk is used to make Comte cheese but with the decrease in production volume in winter, the unpasteurised milk goes into the delicious washed rind wonder Vacherin.

I was introduced to this cheese by Jared Wybrow at the London Cheesemongers, where it was sitting in the midst of a table laden with cheeses for a progressive tasting. It looked intriguing – all wrinkly and white in it’s wooden box. The box is made from thin strips of spruce, which contributes a subtle piney flavor to the cheese, by the way.

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The exterior is squidgy and, when barely pushed with a spoon, reveals a lovely, golden paste that is fondue-like in texture. My first taste at London Cheesemongers was so luscious and captivating that I had to buy one to bring home.

IMG_3532It made for an indulgent dinner when paired with green salad, bread, crackers and a variety of dried and fresh fruit. That is how I enjoyed mine and I highly recommend it to you. I heated it briefly in the oven in it’s box, which made the inside even more delightfully runny.

IMG_3535Vacherin Mont D’or is the perfect cheese for autumnal and holiday celebrations. It partners wonderfully with sparkling and red wine, cider and seasonal craft beer and would be a worthy addition to a cheese board for Thanksgiving or the December holidays.

So put it down on your shopping list. If you are in London, by all means go visit Jared at London Cheesemongers for the cream of the crop of Vacherin. The season for this heavenly cheese runs all the way through spring so you have some time to get your hands on a lovely round of it.

 

 

 

Magic from the Isle of Wight

The first time I strolled through our weekly farmers market in Balham, I was immediately drawn to the beautiful stall from Isle of Wight tomatoes.

All through the dreary London winter, the folks from Isle of Wight would show up each week with their bounty of fresh tomatoes in shades of yellow and red as well as a bevy of products from the farm, such as passata, ketchup, slow roasted tomatoes with spices and organic oak roasted tomatoes.

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When I marvelled at finding fresh tomatoes in London in January, they explained that the Isle of Wight is positioned to get more sun then the mainland of England. The farm is located in the Arreton Valley, an area that has produced tomatoes for quite some time in the rich, loamy soil there. The tomatoes are vine-ripened in large greenhouses and nourished with compost produced on-site from all the spent plants and other growing material. Upwards of 200 varieties are grown throughout the year by both organic and conventional methods and Isle of Wight uses biodynamic principles to curb pests, pollinate the plants and promote natural habitats around the farm.

Lately the stall has had padron peppers, those petite, piquant capsicums popular at Spanish tapas restaurants.

They are dead easy to prepare and lip-smacking good to eat. Simply heat a pan and add a generous splash of really good olive oil. When it’s shimmering, toss in the padrons. Stir them frequently in the hot oil until they blister and get browned then turn out on a platter and serve with salt – I used Hawaiian red salt.

Another inspiring product, the oak smoked tomatoes, featured this week in a bastardised Caprese salad for lunch. Smoked and fresh tomatoes were mixed with chunks of ripe avocado and creamy, fresh mozzarella then showered with fresh basil and splashes of Tuscan olive oil; each bite transported me to Florence in the early summer when tomatoes and basil have just returned from winter break. The smoked tomatoes contributed intense bursts of flavor with a haunting backbeat. Tonight I’m thinking of adding them to a cheesy pasta dish with asparagus but they’d also be great with other starchy ingredients like potatoes or rice or in egg dishes.

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Suffice it to say the products at Isle of Wight Tomato Farm really get my creative juices flowing. And I’ve been nourished in health and spirit by a little taste of summer even when a cold rain is falling outside.

PERSIMMONS: THE FRUIT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING

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This time of year in Northern California, you can walk around in neighborhoods and see big trees that have lost their leaves but are full of beautiful orange fruit. These are persimmons and they are prolific trees that produce with abundance each year.

There are two major kinds: fuyu, which are eaten when they are hard like an apple, and hachiya, which need to get very very soft to be used. The trees are beautiful but the fruit doesn’t have as many fans as you might think. Generally, people aren’t sure what to do with persimmons.

A friend dropped by a bag of fuyus for me the other day so I got to experimenting in the kitchen.

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They are terrific with cheese on an appetizer plate. Here they are paired them with pomegranate seeds and a triple creme cheese – delicious!

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Salads are another place for persimmons to star. Toss one thinly sliced fuyu with butter lettuce, candied walnuts and creamy goat cheese in a lemon vinaigrette.

They are also good in this double kale salad – use your favorite roasted kale recipe to create the crisp shards for the topping.

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DOUBLE KALE SALAD

5 leaves of fresh dino kale, sliced very thinly into ribbons

1 fuyu persimmon, julienned

2 tablespoons dried cranberries

1/2 cup of roasted kale chips

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DRESSING

1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar

2 1/2 tablespoons orange infused olive oil – such as O Clementine Olive Oil

1 1/2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil

Salt and pepper

 

1.Toss fresh kale, cranberries and persimmons in a large bowl until mixed.

2. Make dressing: put vinegar in a small bowl and gradually whisk in oils. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Toss salad with just enough dressing to coat all the pieces. Distribute salad between 4 plates and top with the kale chips. Serve immediately.