A Classic Use for Leftovers

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If you’re following the local seasonal mantra, then there isn’t a lot of choice here in England in February. Roots, potatoes, onions, cabbage and lots of kale are on the menu, especially for the country’s lauded Sunday roast – a big noontime meal with everything crisped up in a hot oven. The next day frugal cooks take the leftover bits of roasted veggies, mash them together and fry the mass into “bubble and squeak”. Some say the term refers to the sound the cabbage makes as its being fried and some say it refers to the sound your GI system makes after consumption. In any event, on a chilly winter evening a round of bubble and squeak can be quite a comforting dish and it goes rather nicely with salty meats (bacon or ham), poached eggs and early spring vegetables like asparagus.

If you aren’t much for Sunday roasts and don’t have leftovers laying around, you can easily construct bubble and squeak from the ground up.

Slice leeks and sauté with minced garlic until  tender and just beginning to caramelize.

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Boil peeled potatoes with some chunks of peeled turnip (known as swede here) until soft. I purchased this massive specimen at our weekly farmers market in Balham, as well as the leeks, cabbage and potatoes.

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When fork tender, mash it together with some rich mascarpone (you can also use creme fraiche), butter and just enough milk to make it smooth but stiff, as well as plenty of salt and pepper. Stir in the leek mixture and some cooked cabbage.

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Form into thick cakes and chill. The cakes are then fried until browned on each side, perched on crisp tender steamed asparagus and topped with a juicy slice of ham. This dish is really good served with something sweet and fruity, such as Cranberry Apple Pear Relish.

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Maybe not entirely traditional but a California take on a classic, cooking mostly with what is coming out of the fields and farms in England right now.

Bubble and Squeak Cakes with Ham and Asparagus

3 medium potatoes – such as Yukon Gold or King Edward – peeled and quartered

1 medium turnip peeled and quartered

1 leek

olive oil

1 large clove garlic, minced

1/4 head of a small cabbage cut in three pieces

2 tablespoons mascarpone cheese

1 tablespoon butter

1/4 cup milk – or as needed

10 asparagus spears

Applewood smoked ham – either 1 or 2 slices totalling 4 oz or 125 grams

Two poached eggs – optional

Boil the potatoes and turnips together in a medium pot of copiously salted water. Slice the leek in half lengthwise, keeping the root intact, and rinse thoroughly. Make another long lengthwise cut so the leek is cut in quarters horizontally then cut crosswise in 1/4″ pieces. Heat the olive oil in a 10″ frying pan and saute the leek with the garlic until tender and golden. Simmer the cabbage in a small pot of salted water to cover until cooked through; when cool enough to handle, finely chop and set aside.

When the potatoes and turnips are soft, drain and mash them with the mascarpone and butter, adding milk if needed until mixture holds together. Stir in the leeks and cabbage and season with salt and pepper. Form into two 6″X 1/2″ cakes then pop them in the fridge to chill for 30 minutes.

In the meantime, trim the asparagus ends and get them set up in a shallow pan with a lid to steam; have a frying pan at the ready to cook the ham. Take out the cakes and heat up the pan used for sautéing the leeks over medium high heat. Add some butter and once it’s melted add the cakes. At this point get the asparagus steaming until crisp tender and sizzle the ham in a hot pan until golden on each side then keep everything warm. Peek at the underside of the cakes to see if they are deep golden then turn and repeat on the other side.

To serve, divide the asparagus between two plates, top with the bubble and squeak cakes and then the ham. If you want to gild the lily, crown each stack with a poached egg and wolf down before it gets cold.

Serves 2

 

 

Signs of Spring in London

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Since my last post, I picked up stakes and moved from sunny California to London, arriving in mid-October. The city is quite a contrast to my suburban West Coast home with it’s large garden and temperate climes. Here, the constant frigid grayness of January has merged into rainy, chilly February – which had me searching last weekend for signs of spring.

Delicate snow drops are peeking out of just-thawed dirt throughout London’s vacant lots, public parks and gardens. I took this photo at Chelsea Physic Garden last weekend.

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Another sign showed up on the produce shelves at my local Waitrose grocery store. Known as “forced rhubarb”, this typically spring vegetable (that is treated like a fruit) is grown indoors under curious circumstances. Coming from an area known as the rhubarb triangle in Yorkshire, the rhizome is initially started outdoors where it absorbs nutrients from the sun, and is moved indoors after the first frost in November. Once inside the rhubarb shed, it is grown in complete darkness and harvested by candlelight (Image courtesy ChicagoNow) throughout the winter months.

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This treatment creates ruby red, subtly sweet and tender stalks. In 2010 the EU designated the rhubarb triangle a PDO – Protected Designation of Origin status – a recognition bestowed on such lofty products as Stilton for its cheese and Champagne in France.

The cheery crimson sticks make a great compote when cooked up with exotic spices. I used star anise, whole cloves and a cinnamon stick along with orange juice and zest and layered the compote with rich rice pudding in parfait glasses.

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However the mixture would be tasty paired with your morning porridge or yogurt and granola or delicious served alongside sausages, roast pork or duck, turkey and chicken.

Start by cutting the trimmed stalks in 1 inch pieces.

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Then simmer them in a wide saucepan with the sugar, spices and orange until just soft.

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My hope is that this little taste of spring will stay with me until the days get longer, the gray skies clear and London bursts into the blooming, bird singing springtime of my dreams.

Spiced Poached Rhubarb

1 pound rhubarb, washed, trimmed and cut in 1″ pieces

2 whole star anise pods

1 cinnamon stick

2 whole cloves

Juice and zest of 1 large navel orange

6 tablespoons brown, muscovado or coconut sugar

Combine all the ingredients in a wide saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat so mixture is on a gentle simmer and cook until rhubarb is just-tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and serve warm, room temperature or cold.

Yield: About 1 1/2 cups

 

 

 

 

We’re Jammin’!

With plentiful summer fruits in market bins and baskets around the country right now, the craving to preserve it for winter is high on my list. I have a terrific recipe from my friend Therese’ mom for raspberry plum jam and I make plenty of it during these warm months to nourish us throughout the year. A spoonful on toast, mixed into yogurt or baked into thumbprint cookies brings back the feeling of a warm summer day.

PLUM RASPBERRY JAM

Equipment:

1. 6- 8 oz canning jars with sealable lids
2. Canning pot with rack and lid or a stockpot large enough to hold 10 jars
3. Enamel or copper sauce pot that is wide and shallow, Le Creuset works well
4. Wide mouth funnel
5. Canning jar tongs, regular tongs, ladle

Recipe:

4 cups chopped plums

2 cups raspberries

4 1/2 cups sugar

Lemon juice if desired

Wash the fruit well. Pit the plums and roughly chop – I use the Cuisinart for this task.

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I put the berries through a food mill to get rid of the majority of the seeds but you don’t have to do that if you don’t mind the seeds.

Meanwhile, wash the canning jars and put in a canner or large soup pot, cover with water and turn on high heat. You will need to bring to a boil then boil for 10 minutes to sterilize. Put the lid on to make this go a little faster.

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Put all the fruit into a wide, shallow saucepan. Turn heat to medium high, bring to a simmer and cook the fruit down a smudge, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. IMG_0261

Add the sugar all at once and stir well to incorporate; keep stirring until it all dissolves. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to a brisk simmer stirring frequently and skimming any foam off the top; if you don’t skim the foam your jam won’t be as clear and may have pockets of white foam that gels into it.

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Keep an eye on the mixture, stirring frequently so it doesn’t cook down too much and scorch on the bottom. Gradually you’ll notice the color and viscosity change and you may catch a glimpse of the bottom of the pot as you stir through the jam. It’s getting close!

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By now your jars should be done with the 10 minute sterilization. Hold them in the hot water until the jam is ready. Bring a kettle to the boil, put the sealing lid inserts in a wide, flat pan and pour boiling water over them.

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Pull the jars out of the canning pot, emptying out all water and place on a clean surface. Using a wide mouth canning funnel, ladle the jam into the jars, leaving 1/2″ headspace at the top – no less and no more. Put the sealing lids and rings on and tighten then put the full jars back in the canner making sure each is covered by at least 1/2″ water. Bring back to a boil and boil for 10 minutes. This is called processing and makes the jam shelf-stable for at least 6 months or more.

When your timer goes off, pull the jars out and place on a tray or tea towel to cool down. It can take up to 24 hours for the jars to seal and when they do you may hear a “pop”.

Label and put the jam away for a rainy or snowy day. Rest easy knowing that, just like the squirrels, you’ve done your part to store up supplies for the winter ahead.

Bowled Over

Meal bowls are an easy way to get dinner on the table in a jiffy. In my recent article on Zester Daily  I explore the topic and give some recipes using seasonal ingredients and tips on how to creatively repurpose leftovers into yummy bowls for every meal of the day.

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This savory yogurt bowl doubles as a fantastic dip with pita chips or crudités.

Citrus time

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The plethora of citrus fruit in market bins right now is inspiring. For ideas on how to use it all, check out my article on Zester Daily:

http://zesterdaily.com/fruit-wrecipe/zesty-citrus-fruits-brighten-winter-meals/

What to do with Hachiya persimmons

Any other fruit that looked like this would be tossed into the compost bin.

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Around northern California persimmon trees grow in backyards and gardens. The orange orbs continue to hang on the tree after all the leaves drop off, creating a skeletal and yet abundant image. Many people don’t like the taste or don’t know what to do with the prolific fruit.

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These Hachiya and Suijo persimmons are finally ripe enough to cook with after sitting in my garage for the last month. Since they are an astringent variety of this deep orange fruit, they can only be used when they are absolutely mushy.

 

One of my favorite ways to use juicy, soft persimmons is in James Beard’s boozy persimmon bread recipe. It calls for 2 cups of persimmon pulp, which is easy to scrape out by cutting off the top of the fruit and using a spoon to extract the pulp.

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I used six Hachiyas and three Suijos to get 2 cups.

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The recipe is simple to make, a basic quick bread with dry ingredients combined in a bowl and the liquids added all at once in a well made in the center. It makes a generous amount which you can divide into two loaf pans, six mini loaves or eight mini bundt cakes.

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The flavor is reminiscent of a fruit cake with a little taste of alcohol, bursts of dried fruit and the crunch of nuts.

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The recipe freezes really well too – here are my foil packages of persimmon bread ready to go in the deep freeze for enjoyment with a cup of tea or use as a hostess gift down the road.

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Persimmon Bread

Adapted from “Beard on Bread” by James Beard.

Yield: two 9-inch loaves or 6 mini loaves or 8 mini bundt cakes

3 1/2 cups flour, sifted

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

2 -2 1/2 cups sugar (I used the lesser amount)

1 cup melted butter, cooled to room temperature

4 large eggs

2/3 cup cognac, bourbon or whiskey (I like bourbon)

2 cups persimmon puree

2 cups walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped

2 cups diced dried fruit or raisins (I like to use a mix of golden raisins and dried apricots, nectarines or dates)

Coat the inside of the loaf or cake pans with canola baking spray very well. Preheat the oven to 350. Sift the first 5 dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the center then stir in the remaining ingredients, mixing completely until well combined. Divide batter among prepared pans. Bake in oven 1 hour for regular loaves and 40-50 minutes for mini loaves or mini bundt cake pans. Test for doneness with a toothpick, which should come out clean when inserted into the center. Cool on rack for 10 minutes then take out of pans and continue to cool to room temperature.

 

 

 

Prolific cookbook author has released new books

My friend Michele Anna Jordan, Sonoma county food expert, cookbook author, food columnist and radio personality, has just released SIX new cookbooks! Whew! That lady is one busy cook! She is offering a special deal for any books purchased on her birthday, which is in three days on July 6th. I helped out on some of the photos for “Meatballs” and can vouch for the deliciousness of all the recipes and for her expertise in all culinary endeavors – you definitely need some of Michele’s books for your collection:

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